Milk is good IF ITS RAW… 

Growing up we’ve all been told that Milk is good. However there’s been a growing voice that Milk is Bad. The Avoid Dairy camp has got larger and larger which begs the question: Is there something wrong with Milk? Or is there something wrong with Pasteurised Milk? In the 19th century Louis Pasteur developed “Pasteurisation”. The concept is to heat the milk up to a certain temperature to kill any bad bacteria. The problematic  is that it kills good bacteria too. In fact valuable enzymes are destroyed, vitamins (such as A, C, B6 and B12) are diminished, fragile milk proteins are radically transformed from health nurturing to unnatural amino acid configurations that can actually worsen your health. 


Raw milk is truly one of the most nutrient-dense foods in the world and has a nutritional profile unlike any other food. The trick is to source raw milk from organically nurtured grass fed cows. And it’s best to source this from your local farmers market. 

Why raw milk? Here are 5 reasons. What appeals to me most is the probiotics you get from raw milk especially when you ferment it into kefir. Priorities are they KEY to creating a strong immune system which is the KEY ingredient to leading a healthy and well balanced life! 

  • Contains Fat Soluble Vitamins A, D, and K2 
  • Short Chain Fatty Acids, CLA and Omega-3’s
  • Minerals: Calcium, Magnesium and Potassium
  • Probiotics: Kefir, Cheese, Yogurt 
  • Whey Protein and Immunoglobulins

For further reading : 

raw milk huffpost
the truth about Pasteurisation
raw milk health benefits

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